http://www.theblaze.com/stories/so-how-bad-is-the-public-funding-in-greece-a-brothel-is-now-sponsoring-an-elementary-school/

That Greece has major financial issues should come as a surprise to no one. But it’s interesting every now and then to put their problems into perspective.

For instance, because Greece’s public financing has become something of a national joke (i.e. there isn’t anything left), a school in Patra, located in the Peloponnese, recently accepted the financial sponsorship of brothel owner Soula Alevridou.

“Following an open invitation for sponsorship launched by a Patra elementary school parents association, Alevridou pledged to donate 3,000 euros to the educational facility in order to cover for a series of operational costs, a daily Peloponnesian newspaper reported,” Kathimerini reports.

“According to reports, the funds would be used to purchase a photocopier and a library for the school,” the report adds.

The important thing to consider here is the word “sponsorship.” You know what this means, right?

“[A] whorehouse is advertising its ‘services’ to children in an elementary school,” writes at Zero Hedge bluntly note.

Yep. A brothel stepped up and offered to sponsor the school. And what does the school get in return? Money for a photocopier and a library.

“This is what complete social collapse looks like,” Zero Hedge grouses. “First, the local Neo Nazi party has soared in the polls and is now the third most popular Greek party. Then, in lieu of other sources of capital, a local brothel became the head sponsor of a minor-league soccer club from Larissa.”

“Now, the same brothel which appears to have seen a substantial return on its advertising spend, has decided to branch out… straight into a local elementary school,” they add.

Final Thought: What else was the school board to do? They needed the cash and Alevridou, who is turning a tidy profit, took them up on their offer. There just simply wasn’t any public funding available.

But should this come as a surprise?

In statist countries like Greece, where the government spends more than it takes in and then tries to tax the difference, “eventually you run out of other people’s money.”

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